£15,000 bonus for Scottish charities and community groups

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As some of you will know I volunteer with Scottish Community Foundation, sitting on their National Grants Committee. As part of my role I now sit on the Scottish steering group for localgiving.com, a hyper-local online giving platform owned 50% by Community Foundation Network and 50% by the Ardbrakc Foundation.

Localgiving.com is unique in the fact that various rounds of match funding will be rolled out during 2012, effectively allowing donors to double their money. From 14th May any donation made to Scottish charities registered with Localgiving.com will receive matched funds from a pot worth £15,000.

The Localgiving.com May Match Fund starts at 9am on 14 th May and will continue until the full £15,000 is allocated to Scottish Charities.

By making a donation to a favourite local charity via Localgiving.com, donors can double their gift and the charity receives twice the support as Localgiving.com Scotland matches the amount, with a further 25% coming from Gift Aid. Over 50 Scottish charities have registered with the site, all of which are eligible for match funding. Charities and groups not already registered are encouraged to become part of the initiative by contacting the Scottish Community Foundation or Localgiving.com. Registration is free for the first three months then just £6 per month.

Online fundraising half-day workshop – Glasgow 23rd Feb 2012

If you’re a fundraiser, someone new to the profession or if raising funds is part of your wider role then it’s hard to ignore the potential of online tools and social media. For many charities their online giving strategy starts and stops with a donate-button on their website, often with little thought put in to how they’ll encourage people to part with their hard earned cash. 

Our Third Sector Lab Online Fundraising workshop is here to help. Hosted by Sara Thomas, Fundraiser with MND Scotland and former Be Good Be Social speaker, the half-day workshop will give you everything you need to get started fundraising online.

Part of the GCVS Learning and Development programme, the training workshop is just £65 for members or £85 for non-members. The workshop runs twice on Thu 23rd February 2012, allowing you to choose between a morning or afternoon session.

What Sara will be covering:

· An introduction to online fundraising tools – how to get started & notes on best practice

· Incorporating online fundraising into your overall fundraising strategy

· Practical workshop – how do we make this work in your organisation?

What Sara wants participants to bring:

· Enthusiasm

· Curiosity

· Any questions that they have about online fundraising, especially ones specific to their organisation.

What Sara wants participants to take from the session:

· A clear idea of the range of online fundraising tools available

· To feel confident about getting started, or feel more secure in their existing knowledge

· To feel confident about integrating online/digital fundraising into their existing strategy

· Ideas for the use of online fundraising that’s specific to their organisation

· To come away with practical tips about digital fundraising that are drawn from case study and real life experience

Book online now.

£65 GCVS members, £85 non-members.

You can choose between a morning or afternoon session.

Thu 23rd February 2012 9.30am – 12.30pm

Thu 23rd February 2012 1.30pm – 4.30pm

You can contact Stacey on 0141 332 2444 or stacey.anderson@gcvs.org.uk if you’d prefer to be invoiced or to have a booking form sent to you.

This workshop is part of a range of social media training workshops available at GCVS in partnership with Third Sector Lab.

Should staples and sticky tape be paid for by donations?

When Oxfam and PayPal launched 100% Giving back in January it sparked a huge debate on my blog. Well it’s back this September, PayPal is paying Oxfam’s admin costs on all donations made through PayPal. ‘100% on seeds and schoolbooks. 0% on staples and stickytape’ reads the tagline.

Is 100% Giving a good thing or does it skew the public’s views on what are ‘essential’ costs in running a charity?