Make 2012 the year your charity gets serious about social media #Scotland

Have a butchers at pages 3 & 4. I’ve helped GCVS put together a digital media training programme for 2012, aided by various #BeGoodBeSocial regulars:

  • Writing for the web – Content strategistic, copywriter and keen cyclist Ann Cook will be hosting this workshop exploring blogs, newsletters, content strategy and more.

 

  • Social media basics – I’ll be hosting this one, you’ll hear from some people making real headway with social media in the Scottish third sector throughout the day.

 

  • Using Twitter and Facebook for your organisation – I’ll be joined by Martin Keane, Social Media Strategist with Third Sector Lab and digital chap for SCIAF for this one.

 

  • Measuring your online success – This workshop will be hosted by Conrad Rossouw of Shelter Scotland. He’ll be giving solid practical advice on how you can measure your impact online.

 

  • Online fundraising – This one will be hosted by Sara Thomas, fundraiser with MND Scotland. She’ll be haring her experiences of using online fundraising tools  within MND Scotland.

 

  • Video for the web – #BeGoodBeSocial video expert Erin Maguire will take workshop attendees through the process of planning, shooting, editing and uploading a video from scratch.

Booking details are included in the PDF above.

Blogging and commenting guidelines from The Guardian

1. Participate in conversations about our content, and take responsibility for the conversations you start.

2. Focus on the constructive by recognising and rewarding intelligent contributions.

3. Don’t reward disruptive behaviour with attention, but report it when you find it.

4. Link to sources for facts or statements you reference, and encourage others to do likewise.

5. Declare personal interest when applicable. Be transparent about your affiliations, perspectives or previous coverage of a particular topic or individual.

6. Be careful about blurring fact and opinion and consider carefully how your words could be (mis)interpreted or (mis)represented.

7. Encourage readers to contribute perspective, additional knowledge and expertise. Acknowledge their additions.

8. Exemplify our community standards in your contributions above and below the line.

A useful list from The Guardian that could easily be tailored for staff bloggers within non-profit organisations.

Anything missing?

Blog Comments РAre they really pass̩e?

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According to Mashable, popular gadget site Engadget has recently shut down comments. According to Engadget it’s a temporary measure but the blog took it because the “tone in comments has really gotten out of hand.”

As Mashable point out, John Gruber’s blog has famously always shunned comments.

For me the whole point of blogging is the social side of it. I don’t see it as a broadcast medium.

So what do others think…are comments really passée?

Should we rely solely on reactions on Twitter, Facebook etc to fill the comments void?